Sawyer, A. (2016), Is Money Enough?: The Effect of Migrant Remittances on Parental Aspirations and Youth Educational Attainment in Rural Mexico.

Sawyer, A. (2016), Is Money Enough?: The Effect of Migrant Remittances on Parental Aspirations and Youth Educational Attainment in Rural Mexico. Int Migr Rev, 50: 231–266. doi:10.1111/imre.12103

This research compares remittance-receiving families in rural Mexico to non-remittance receiving households in terms of how the presence of this financial source relates to variation in parent educational aspirations for their children and youth enrollment and completion at the non-compulsory upper secondary schooling level. Using multivariate analysis of a comprehensive survey collected in a significant migrant-sending state, no evidence is found of a remittance effect on the selected outcomes. Rather, other socio-demographic background factors — namely, maternal education levels and to a lesser extent household wealth — are the factors most associated with variation in these educational outcomes. Implications for migration and education public policy and suggestions for future research are discussed.

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Gray, B. (2016), The Politics of Migration, Church, and State: A Case Study of the Catholic Church in Ireland

Gray, B. (2016), The Politics of Migration, Church, and State: A Case Study of the Catholic Church in Ireland. Int Migr Rev, 50: 315–351. doi:10.1111/imre.12165

This article investigates the ways in which a shift from post-colonial nation building to neoliberal state restructuring has shaped church and Irish state relations regarding migrant welfare. It develops the extensive work of Bäckström and Davie (2010) and Bäckström et al. (2011) on how majority churches in European countries are reclaiming a social welfare role as the state relinquishes this responsibility: first, by examining the domain of migrant welfare which is not developed in their work; and second, by arguing that majority church pro-migrant service provision, as it has evolved in recent decades, can be understood in relation to an emergent neoliberal mode of collective responsibility for migrant welfare. It suggests that in spite of other factors and forces that undermine Irish Catholic Church authority, the marketization of more domains of life in the first decades of the twenty-first century has given new significance to Catholic Social Teaching and pro-migrant church initiatives.

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